Blog

Cool Springs EyeCare
  • Love My Work Place Glasses
    Love My Work Place GlassesI am going to admit something to you that I probably shouldn t are you ready? Yesterday I drove home in my work place glasses. Yikes! Many of you may be saying, what are work place glasses and others of you that have them are probably saying, I ve done the same thing . If you are approaching half a century in chronologic age, you have probably noticed in our digital world that your standard progressive works well at the computer but not perfectly. That is because in a standard progressive lens the power gradually improves as you look down through the lens. Yet where do we look at our computer in today s world? Typically, straight ahead (ideally 20 degrees below the horizon). The other factor that we know is that to put every power needed in a progressive lens there must be some compromises. One of the compromises is that the computer range power has the narrowest field of vision. Since we now use wider and wider monitors, this means the standard ...
  • What Do You know about "DEWS"?
    "DEWS" and Dry EyesWhat do you know about DEWS ? Now, we are in the South, so I am not talkin about doos you know this or doos you know that . I m talking about DEWS. DEWS stands for the Dry Eye Workshop Study Group, an international collection of expert Optometrists and Ophthalmologists that specialize in dry eyes. They have recently published their second collective report to advise practitioners and patients on one of the more common eye problems in the world dry eyes or more commonly and accurately known as ocular surface disease/disorder. Dry Eyes as a title can sound confusing simply because a lot of the time a patient will say my eyes don t feel dry; however, they do burn, or they itch, or they feel scratchy, or they hurt, or they water a lot (isn t that a confusing symptom for a person with dry eyes?!).To bring us all to the same page, ocular surface disorders or what we ll call dry eyes are typically caused by two types of underlying problems. Either you don t pr...
  • Summer Update
    SUMMER UPDATEI don t know about you, but it sure feels good to walk outside and feel the warmth of the sun. I know, for a lot of people there is no happy middle ground as it may be too hot when you walk outside. As for me (and particularly my wife Susan) we can tolerate the heat better than we can tolerate the cold. Hence, we may still root for our Buckeyes in Ohio, but we don t want to live there!On to some new innovations and people that I m really excited about at our offices. First, many people swear by their Transitions lenses. They provide an adjustment to vision in bright sunny conditions as well as under hazy conditions. They are truly a lifestyle lens that adjusts their darkening to environmental conditions. I realize that others of you swear at Transitions . Part of this is because they continue to be darker upon re entering the office or home after being outdoors. This can be a nuisance. I m not sure that s been fixed yet, although there have been modest improve...
  • Update on Glaucoma
    UPDATE ON GLAUCOMACyPass Micro StentJanuary is National Glaucoma Awareness Month, but we evaluate and educate our patients every month of the year. Treatments for glaucoma in the U.S. are primarily eye drops, laser or occasional surgery. The CyPass Micro Stent is a new surgical option that shows great promise and may make us reevaluate the order of our prescribed glaucoma therapies. Check out our blog below for more information. Enjoy!Our surgeon, Dr. Aaron Porter, is now performing the CyPass Micro Stent which is a new development in the treatment of glaucoma. This surgical procedure is performed during cataract surgery and is used for the treatment of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma. Patients with glaucoma may suffer from increased eye pressure which can cause vision loss. The CyPass implant is placed between the sclera and ciliary body of the eye at the same time patients are undergoing cataract surgery. The stent is an extra step in maintaining a balanced eye pressure. When the stent i...
  • What's New in the World of Retinal Problems?
    It's the holiday season and a wonderful time to see happy faces, Christmas lights and the beauty of the season. We want you to enjoy those things for years to come and the biggest threat to our central (straight ahead) vision is developing macular degeneration. So in an effort to keep you updated on what you should know and do to protect your vision, here is some updated information on risk prevention in macular degeneration.Reducing the RiskMacular degeneration is the biggest risk for vision loss in adults over 50 years old. Both genetics (see below*) and environment play a part. See the checklist below to help reduce your risk for macular degeneration. Don t Smoke If You Do Stop; If You Don t Don t StartTry Not To Get Diabetes If You Do Keep A Low A1C Indoor Glasses Blue Light Protection on Digital DevicesOutdoor Glasses Ultraviolet Protection Macular Pigment Density > .50 Do You Know Your Score?Macular Genetics Simple Cheek Swab to Know What You Inherited Eye Suppl...
  • November is Diabetes Awareness Month
    Did you know more than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes and 79 million more are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? Uncontrolled or long standing diabetes can cause damage to your blood vessels, especially the small vessels in the back of the eye. Retinopathy is when these fragile vessels begin to leak and cause a negative effect on your vision. In the United States, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of preventable blindness. Yet, 3.6 million Americans suffer from this disease! Severe vision loss can usually be prevented with early detection, diagnosis and treatment. To reduce your risk of visual complications from diabetes, remember your ABCs: A A1C Get your A1C checked at least twice a year and set a goal with your physician (typically B Blood Pressure Monitor your blood pressure closely and keep it under 140/80.C Cholesterol Exercise and eat less saturated fat and trans fat eat more fiber! If you have diabetes, our doctors recommend comprehensi...
  • LipiFlow - New Treatment for Dry Eyes
    Dry eye patients now have a new treatment option that could drastically improve their symptoms for as long as two years. LipiFlow is an in office procedure that gently heats and massages the meibomian glands located within the eyelids. Background of MGDMeibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) can be caused by several factors. The glands within the eye produce oils every time you blink. The oil combines with tears to keep the eye hydrated and healthy. Several factors cause MGD, including poor diet, lack of hydration, systemic diseases, environmental factors, or genetics. Healthy glands become clogged and tears evaporate much quicker than normal. Symptoms of this condition include excessive watering, redness, blurred vision, or irritation along the lid margin. Why LipiFlowUntil now, we gave treated MGD with eyelid scrubs, heat and medications. With the use of LipiFlow, symptoms of dry eye improve for a longer period of time. LipiFlow is minimally invasive and completely painless. Long term drop...
  • Dr. Jeff and Susan Kegarise's Advanced Contact Lens Training
    Dr. Jeff and Susan Kegarise recently attended Alcon s Academy for Eyecare Excellence Practitioners Visiting Alcon (PVA) Program. Only a handful of practitioners nationwide received advanced training on successfully fitting patients with progressive/multifocal contact lenses. According to Alcon, only 6% of optometrists nationwide have been professionally trained to fit patients with multifocal contact lenses! This hands on training took place at the Alcon Experience Center, a 36,000 square foot facility at Alcon s global headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas. The center featured a fully equipped optometric exam lane, an enhanced wet lab for training in the ophthalmic surgical environment, and a variety of interactive technologies to create a world class training experience in eye care. Patient care comes first at Cool Springs and Donelson EyeCare. We are extremely proud of our doctors for continuing to advance their education. Their hard work and dedication allows us to better improve the ...
  • Sunglasses for Cancer?
    It seems that not a month goes by where I don t run into someone (a friend, a colleague, a patient) who is scheduled for or has had a procedure for facial cancer. MOHS surgeons, typically fellowship trained, provide a valuable therapeutic and cosmetic service by making sure the least amount of facial tissue is removed, while still eliminating premalignant and/or malignant lesions of the face.Lumps, bumps, spots and changes occur around our eyes and eyelids. Fortunately, most are benign. Some are barely noticeable, while others, cosmetically atrocious. The most common location for bumps to occur is on the lower eyelid and under the eye. This tissue is sensitive and most exposed to ultraviolet rays while we are outside. We can remove nearly all bumps on or around the eyes, and most all, quickly, painlessly and in office. Some require a pathologic biopsy just to be sure, while a few need full oculoplastic specialists. Lets face it (no pun intended), we don t have a lot of extra skin t...
  • Eclipse Safety
    We re excited about the upcoming eclipse on Monday, August 21st. If you re at the Cool Springs office we are actually going to take a break for thirty minutes before and after the eclipse, as this is a once in a lifetime event.We are providing free eclipse sunglasses for those patients having exams or buying glasses. As your eye doctor, our primary concern is for your eye health and safety. I want to emphasize a few precautions with the eclipse upcoming;Looking through old polaroid negatives, standard welding glasses, normal sunglasses even polarized, is not safe. The intense focus of the sun s rays have been documented to cause holes on the back of the eye at the macula. Clinically, we call this solar retinopathy. Small holes lead to blind spots in the central part of vision. There are only a few companies who have been sanctioned and approved to provide enough protection from solar rays in and around an eclipse and thus allow safe viewing. One of those companies, American Paper Opt...
  • This Light Will Eclipse Everything!
    A once in a lifetime occurrence. You don t hear that very often. On August 21st, 2017 (six weeks from now), a seventy four mile swath of our country, from Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina will witness a total solar eclipse.It will start in Oregon and gradually move toward us, being most visible in the early afternoon. If you miss it this August, you will have to live 500 more years before the next one, so plan accordingly.Does it ever strike you as odd that eye doctors tell you not to look at the sun, and then proceed to examine your eyes with hideously strong, bright lights? We follow that with our summary discussion, Mrs. Jones here is what I found today , all the while knowing you see nothing but a dark purple after image where our face used to be!Don t watch the eclipse and don t look at the sun without protection. You can develop a solar burn to your retina and that can be permanently, visually altering. However, for this once in a lifetime event we ve got you covered. You ca...
  • Appropriate Lenses for Golfers
    Vision is the most important element of playing golf. The trajectory of the drive and the accuracy of the putt are assessed by vision. The best vision possible can lead to the lowest score possible. A lighter frame (titanium is a great material) will allow you to move around more flexibly and make the movement of following the ball from the tee to the green easier. Larger lenses are recommended to maximize peripheral and straight ahead lines of vision. The best lenses to improve your golf game have to start with 100% UV protection. A long day on the golf course will expose your eyes to a large amount of harmful UV rays, which increase retinal issues as you age. Clarity, contrast and visual sharpness are improved with an anti reflective (A/R) coating. The biggest visual upgrade a golfer can make is using colored lenses. Different colored lenses will provide different capabilities on the golf course. Darker lenses, including brown, amber, and copper are used to improve color contrast bet...
  • What is Lazy Eye?
    We receive a lot of questions from parents on the topic of lazy eye. I have asked Dr. Rachelle Altstadt, our director of Performance Vision Therapy, to address this issue. Enjoy!Also known as amblyopia, lazy eye is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children. This type of vision loss typically occurs in one eye due to the lack of development of the area of the brain that controls vision. The cause of lazy eye is a disruption of binocular visual development due to lack of "two eyed" visual input. Usually this disruption is due to an eye teaming issue or unequal refractive error. How Do I Know Whether or Not My Child Has Lazy Eye?A complete eye exam is necessary to determine if a child is suppressing one eye. Symptoms are not always obvious, but here are a few signs to watch for: An eye turnClosing an eye or covering an eye to seeTilting or turning of the head to seeWhen and How To Treat Lazy EyePreviously, it was thought that lazy eye could only be treated at a young age,...
  • 2017 Sizzle Awards - We Won 1st Place!
    In 1976, Dr. David Brown opened an optometry practice on Main Street in downtown Franklin. It was moved to the Franklin City Hall building in 1986. With the impending growth of a new mall and retail area, the practice was moved to Cool Springs in 1996. In 2000, Drs. Jeff and Susan Kegarise purchased Dr. Brown s practice and Cool Springs EyeCare was born. Over the years, the range of services has expanded to include care for all ages, sports vision, surgical services and vision therapy. Cool Springs EyeCare expanded to 6,700 sq feet in a new building on Aspen Grove Drive in July 2009. In 2011, The Tiger Institute for Cooperative Learning, LLC was formed and is a part of the educational and management structure of the practice for Cool Springs, Donelson, and area health and business professionals. A third bay of exam lanes and The Competitive Edge Sports Vision Training, LLC was added in 2013 to give our current facility 7,800 sq. ft. Thanks to all of our patients who voted for us in...
  • Sports, Vision and Hoops: Contact Lenses
    Many ball players pick contact lenses over glasses if they play sports, especially basketball. Why? Because basketball is a contact sport in more ways than one! While many basketball players play well in glasses, most athletes prefer contact lenses. This is especially true in a sport where peripheral vision and court awareness are important. Here are just a few reasons why contact lenses might have it over glasses in ball sports: Better peripheral vision;Unobstructed field of view;Less likelihood of fogging up or being splattered;Less chance of injury;More stable vision;Better compatibility with safety equipment; and Portable disposable lenses travel well. Our doctors make sure the fit provides good tear flow, clear vision and excellent comfort. We find athletes to be more motivated individuals especially when it comes to enhancing their performance. We have fit children as young as 8 in contacts; however, the ideal age is 10 and up. Considering contact lenses for your athlete should...
  • Glaucoma Awareness Month
    Dr. Jeff Kegarise has invited Dr. Michael Bingham as a guest blogger this month. Enjoy!January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, which is a great time to update our patients on new technology and our processes for detecting early changes due to glaucoma. Recent research has shown that Electroretinography (ERG) has been helpful in detecting the function of the retinal ganglion cell layer in a very precise manner. What does this mean for our patients who have glaucoma or are at risk for glaucoma? It basically means that we have another helpful measure that we can utilize to determine whether any damage to the retina has occurred. Our goal is to detect damage from glaucoma as early as possible so we can minimize the potential for vision loss in our patients. A series of studies have shown that ERG is an extremely sensitive test, at times able to detect damage as much as 8 years earlier than any other method.Fortunately, performing an ERG is very similar to the process of performing a VEP, wh...
  • Welcome to the team, Aaron J. Porter, MD!
    We are excited to introduce to you our new ophthalmologist, Aaron J. Porter, MD. Aaron graduated optometry school from The Ohio State University and medical school from the University of Cincinnati. He was the Chief Resident at Vanderbilt in the early 2000s, which is when he fell in love with Nashville. After practicing for 13 years in Bowling Green, Kentucky, Aaron moved to the middle Tennessee area to our practice. He is a board certified ophthalmologist who treats glaucoma and specializes in laser cataract surgery and refractive surgery. He has performed over 20,000 cataract surgeries and 1,000 LASIK procedures. Aaron is happily married with four children. He enjoys outdoor life and traveling. To book an appointment with this one of a kind doctor, call our office at 615 771 7555....
  • Why Doesn't My Child Read Well?
    We receive a lot of questions from parents on the topic of reading and vision. I have asked Dr. Rachelle Altstadt, our director of Performance Vision Therapy, to address this issue. Enjoy!Good vision requires your child's eyesight, visual pathways, and brain to all work together. When they don't, even a child with 20/20 eyesight can experience difficulty reading, writing and processing information. Three reasons why children have difficulty reading:Accommodative dysfunction. An accommodative dysfunction is a deficit of the focusing system. If your child has a poor focusing system, this may cause blurry vision, eye strain and eye fatigue when reading.Convergence. Convergence is the inward turning of the eyes which keeps the print single as the child reads. Children who are not able to keep their eyes on target may experience double vision when reading. Eye movement disorder. Reading requires accurate and quick eye movements to follow the words in a book. Children who are unable to mak...
  • Congratulations Dr. Jeff Kegarise, Innovator in Optometry!
    Join us in congratulating our practice owner, Dr. Jeff Kegarise, for being named as a top optometric innovator and for making the Primary Care Optometry News (PCON) 250 list. What is the PCON 250 list? Simply stated, it is a list of optometrists who practice progressively, provide innovative patient care, conduct optometric research or excel in academia and share what they have learned with other optometrists to advance the profession. The editors and publisher used no magic formula or algorithm to develop the PCON 250 list. Rather, they went with their collective knowledge and experience with these individuals. Out of the 250 optometrist selected, 9 of them practice in the state of Tennessee. One of them being Dr. Jeff! We are so proud of his contribution and accomplishments. What an incredible doctor and person! ...
  • Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD) Tester
    Beginning on Thursday, November 3rd, our practice will be adding a Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD) tester from ZeaVision. This new technology will allow us to measure the amount of pigment level in the eyes. The thickness or the density of the macular pigment varies from person to person. The density can also change over time depending on several factors such as aging, lifestyle and dietary choices. Do you know your pigment level? If your pigment is low, you are at an increased risk for Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARM). A healthy macular pigment is essential for your vision because it helps to absorb harmful blue light, protecting photo receptors from damage. A dense macular pigment is important to keep your vision as crisp as possible. The good news is that your macular pigment can be increased with the right diet and supplements. Age Related Macular Degeneration is the number one leading cause of blindness in adults. Early detection and careful monitoring of your vision ...